Poem #25: The Lizard in the Bedroom

The Lizard in the Bedroom

The lizard in the bedroom spends its time
between my oaken desks. It breathes through skin
of hunter green and greets me with its tongue.

The lizard in the bedroom sheds its tail
when I have come undone. But in its place
a new one grows, cohering me again.

The lizard in the bedroom hides the names
of others I have loved. Unburdened by
these vestiges, I’m free to love anew.

The lizard in the bedroom looks like you
but only from behind. Your face up close
is more defined and what I had in mind.

The lizard in the bedroom slips away
when I have had enough. A life alone
would suit it well, but still more need its touch.

@NBF 5.11.2009

LoneCloudDC

Washington, DC, 2005

——————–

Notes

I had a dream about a lizard in my bedroom. Naturally, there was also some romance, but the lizard was more a catalyst than it was a participant. I’m not sure what sex the lizard was, so it remains gender-neutral in this poem.

The exact phrase “the lizard in the bedroom” has 2 hits on Google. That seemed disproportionately low to me, but was not the motivation behind the poem.

Blank verse again with some assonant phrases woven together. I cannot endorse blank verse enough.

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Poem #25: The Lizard in the Bedroom”

  1. Guess what is winging (road tripping?) its way to me? Kinzie book! Wheeeeee… and On The Road, 50th Anni edition used hardback. Ok, also some Henry Miller and annotated Alice in Wonderland/Looking Glass and and and… don’t give me diamonds, give me words, art, information, life!

    The last line took me a few tries to read it how I think you meant it… I think I’m just a bit breakfast-lessly brain dead this morning, because now it reads clearly every time. When I get the Kinzie book, I’ll better know what you mean by blank verse?

    • That’s all great to hear. The 50th Anni edition is the one my father got for me. It’s beautiful. Have fun with all that light reading!

      I had a fairly specific idea in mind with this poem, but any poem that invites a lizard into a romantic scene also invites a range of interpretation.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: